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Behavior Support Plan

Quality evaluation of behavior support plan does measure developmental appropriateness. It does not evaluate whether the interventions to teach replacement behavior and the environmental changes to reduce a likelihood of problem behavior are appropriate for the developmental age of the student.

Secondly, the accuracy of identified function of the behavior cannot measure whether the hypothesized function of the problem behavior is accurate and therefore whether all subsequent plan development is valid. The validity of the data collected is important. The behavior should be systematically taught and reinforced to prevent relapse.

Lastly, quality evaluation of behavior support plan does measure whether the plan was skillfully implemented consistently i.e. plans might lack enough details for behavior description.

During her three years of data collection on behavior plan, Ms. Wright identified some common errors. First, the problem behavior is not well described because of lack of insight information associated with the problem behavior. Sometimes the problem behavior environment is not well analyzed therefore identifying the fundamental necessary changes to the problem will result in errors.

Common errors might also result from the poor summary of the necessary interventions to the problem behavior.  The team should identify problem behavior and develop a plan that teaches Functionally Equivalent Replacement Behavior.

Behavior and context environment are related i.e. behavior is most likely to be repeated in the same environment. “The BSP must identify what environmental features support the problem behavior in order to know what environmental changes will stop the need to use the problem behavior” (Wright, 2006).

A behavior plan has two strands. Both the environmental features and teaching a functional equivalent behavior for the student to get the same need met in an acceptable way must be addressed adequately.

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Behavior must be reinforced for learning and mastery to take place. There should be both positive and negative reinforcement for learned behavior.

The team needs to know how to handle recurring problem behavior. These can be done through “distraction, redirection, progressive removals, and school and district disciplinary required actions” (Wright, 2006).

In order to achieve success, frequent communication among the key stakeholders is important. The stakeholders must identify the communication flow channels that are effective.